[PCI DSS 3.0] [PCI DSS 3.0] Compensating controls may be considered for most PCI DSS requirements when an entity cannot meet a r

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Compensating controls may be considered for most PCI DSS requirements when an entity cannot meet a requirement explicitly as stated, due to legitimate technical or documented business constraints, but has sufficiently mitigated the risk associated with the requirement through implementation of other, or compensating, controls.

Compensating controls must satisfy the following criteria:

1. Meet the intent and rigor of the original PCI DSS requirement.

2. Provide a similar level of defense as the original PCI DSS requirement, such that the compensating control sufficiently offsets the risk that the original PCI DSS requirement was designed to defend against. (See Navigating PCI DSS for the intent of each PCI DSS requirement.)
3. Be “above and beyond” other PCI DSS requirements. (Simply being in compliance with other PCI
DSS requirements is not a compensating control.)

When evaluating “above and beyond” for compensating controls, consider the following:

Note: The items at a) through c) below are intended as examples only. All compensating controls must be reviewed and validated for sufficiency by the assessor who conducts the PCI DSS review. The effectiveness of a compensating control is dependent on the specifics of the environment in which the control is implemented, the surrounding security controls, and the configuration of the control. Companies should be aware that a particular compensating control will not be effective in all environments.

a) Existing PCI DSS requirements CANNOT be considered as compensating controls if they are already required for the item under review. For example, passwords for non-console administrative access must be sent encrypted to mitigate the risk of intercepting clear-text administrative passwords. An entity cannot use other PCI DSS password requirements (intruder lockout, complex passwords, etc.) to compensate for lack of encrypted passwords, since those
other password requirements do not mitigate the risk of interception of clear-text passwords. Also, the other password controls are already PCI DSS requirements for the item under review (passwords).

b) Existing PCI DSS requirements MAY be considered as compensating controls if they are required for another area, but are not required for the item under review. For example, two-factor authentication is a PCI DSS requirement for remote access. Two-factor authentication from within the internal network can also be considered as a compensating control for non-console administrative access when transmission of encrypted passwords cannot be supported. Two- factor authentication may be an acceptable compensating control if: (1) it meets the intent of the original requirement by addressing the risk of intercepting clear-text administrative passwords;
and (2) it is set up properly and in a secure environment.

c) Existing PCI DSS requirements may be combined with new controls to become a compensating control. For example, if a company is unable to render cardholder data unreadable per Requirement 3.4 (for example, by encryption), a compensating control could consist of a device or combination of devices, applications, and controls that address all of the following: (1) internal network segmentation; (2) IP address or MAC address filtering; and (3) two-factor authentication from within the internal network.

4. Be commensurate with the additional risk imposed by not adhering to the PCI DSS requirement

The assessor is required to thoroughly evaluate compensating controls during each annual PCI DSS assessment to validate that each compensating control adequately addresses the risk the original PCI DSS requirement was designed to address, per items 1-4 above. To maintain compliance, processes and controls must be in place to ensure compensating controls remain effective after the assessment is complete.
 
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